Underhook suplex

The opponent reacts to both the suplex and being grabbed and lifted by his crotch, to humorous effect.

dragon suplex

This can be performed with or without a pinning combination in which the wrestler bridges their back and legs to hold the opponent's shoulders against the mat.

Running suplex[ edit ] This variation is similar to a classic suplex including the attacking wrestlers begins with a standard front facelock and then when he starts lifting opponent, he makes a few running steps forward while continue the suplex rotation, slamming the opponent back-first onto the mat.

It also goes by the name Capchude, an Engrish term for "captured".

Hammerlock suplex

This move has been more recently used by Beth Phoenix , who does not bridge for a pin, but stalls for a greater impact. The backdrop name is also used in the western world, usually by people who follow Japanese wrestling, although they sometimes use the name Greco-Roman backdrop in reference to Lou Thesz. Slingshot suplex The attacker faces a standing opponent with one side of the ring immediately behind the opponent. A swinging variation of the standard fisherman suplex, this move sees a wrestler, with their opponent in a front facelock with the near arm draped over their shoulder, hook the opponent's near leg with their free arm and roll over to the same side of the arm being used to hook the opponent's leg, flipping the opponent over onto their back. In another variation, the wrestler releases the hold just prior to the sitout position letting his opponents own momentum to force them down head first. The wrestler applies a Front facelock with one arm and underhooks one of the opponent's arms with his other, placing his hand palm down on the back of the opponent. This move is a staple of larger and powerful wrestlers as it gives an aura of dominance over their opponents who can do nothing but wait to drop in the suplex. The attacker then falls forward so that the torso of the opponent bounces off the top ring rope, and uses this momentum to quickly lift the opponent overhead once more and falls backwards, driving the back and shoulders of the opponent into the ground. Sleeper suplex Edit The attacker places the opponent in a sleeper hold and then hooks one of the opponents arms with his free arm. The most common suplex used for this top rope move is the standard vertical suplex variation known as the suicide-plex , in which the attackers apply a front face lock to the opponent, draping the opponent's near arm over their respective shoulders, at this point the wrestler falls backwards and flips the opponent over them so they both land on their backs.

He then lifts the opponent up and falls backwards, driving the opponent on to the top of their head, down to the mat. Bridging leg hook belly to back suplex Edit The attacking wrestler begins this move by standing to one side of, and slightly behind, a standing opponent.

Many wrestlers perform the back suplex into a bridging position, simultaneously arching their own back and legs to elevate themselves, gaining leverage and pinning their opponent.

Front suplex

Three-quarter nelson suplex Edit While behind the opponent the attacker places the opponent in a three-quarter nelson , one arm in a half nelson and the other in a chickenwing , and proceeds to fall backwards while lifting the opponent overhead in the hold and driving them into the mat behind them. For the belly-to-back suplex, the wrestler stands behind his opponent and puts his head under the arm of the opponent. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up grabbing the waist and thigh of the opponent, so the opponent is on the attacker's shoulder. The attacker then lifts the opponent on to their shoulder and then falls backwards, driving the opponent into the mat at a high angle. There is a bridging variation sometimes known as a Bridging hammerlock suplex, which was innovated by Junji Hirata. The wrestler can also release the opponent in mid arch, which is referred to as a release tiger suplex. The wrestler executing the suplex may release the reverse nelson hold during the throw, or can maintain the grip and attempt a bridging pin or submission hold transition upon impact.

The attacker then uses their free arm to reach behind the neck of the opponent and take hold of them. The attacker then reaches under one of the opponents legs with their free arm, and lifts, forcing the opponent to bend into a right angle.

suplex meme

The attacker then turns degrees while falling backwards, slamming the opponent flat on his back. Like other suplex variations, this move can either end in a bridging pin or be released upon execution.

Suplex pronunciation

Double underhook suplex[ edit ] Also known as a double arm suplex, reverse nelson suplex, double axe handle suplex, and a butterfly suplex, the wrestler and opponent face each other, the opponent bent forward. Crossface chickenwing suplex The wrestler stands behind the opponent. The wrestler can also float over into another Northern Lights suplex. The wrestler keeps the waistlock and continues bridging with their back and legs, pinning the opponent's shoulders down against the mat. The attacker then uses their free arm to reach behind the neck of the opponent and take hold of them. WWE announcers have dubbed the sequence the Three Amigos. The attacker finally falls backwards, dropping the opponent flat on his back. This move is also called the sidewinder suplex by Kevin Owens. Bridging leg hook belly to back suplex Innovated by William Regal , who calls it the Regal-Plex, the attacking wrestler begins this move by standing to one side of, and slightly behind, a standing opponent. Finally, the attacker falls backwards, driving the neck and shoulders of the opponent into the ground, simultaneously arching their own back and legs to elevate themselves, gaining leverage and placing the opponent in a pinning predicament.

The attacking wrestler then repeats this numerous times, most commonly three, but sometimes up to eight or more. The attacker then lifts the opponent into a vertical position, and falls into a sit-out position, driving the face of the opponent into the ground.

Rated 10/10 based on 95 review
Download
carriagehouseautoresto.com Message Board: Double underhook suplex