A character analysis of january in the merchants tale by geoffrey chaucer

A character analysis of january in the merchants tale by geoffrey chaucer

An argument by Thomas Aquinas seems fitting here: "Anything whose price can be measured in money is deemed to be money" Shoaf, p. What we see of May is largely a matter of her secret signs and cunning behavior: and the only lengthy description of her, significantly, is given in the context of presenting her as a good option for January to marry.

the merchants tale characters

Various men gave him various advice about marriage, some praising it, some arguing against it, and the altercation continued all day. When they are told of this deceit, they push the truth out of their minds and continue to live in a bubble-like fantasy land where all is good and there is no wrong that has been taught in their life.

It is important to note here that the medieval etymology of 'invidia' envy is 'in-videre,' or 'not to see'" Shoaf, p.

the merchants tale themes

Even though Pluto opened up his physical eyes so that his mind could see the trickery that was displayed before him, January did not succeed in seeing past the blindness of his mind. Bowden writes, "This perception of the Merchant should be fairly accurate, as merchants in the later Middle Ages enjoyed a social position which, for all that it was tacitly and sometimes impermanently held, exceeded that of many a noble" Bowden, p.

Shoaf, R. January loved this garden so much that only he possessed the key to it. How should I thanne, that lyve in swich plesaunce Surveying the young maidens of the country, January chooses a beautiful virgin named May. She is currently working on Shakespeare adaptation for a forthcoming Arden publication. Essays may be lightly modified for readability or to protect the anonymity of contributors, but we do not edit essay examples prior to publication. The Merchant can't see a good marriage. Therefore May is money because she can be bought.

But he stops himself from telling more stories about his own wife, fearing that one of the pilgrims will tell on him. January then decided to get married.

Shoaf suggests that the sight emphasis in "The Merchant's Tale" is owed to the Merchant's envy. His reasons are clear enough: He wants to fulfill God's wish that man and woman marry, and he wants a son to inherit his estates. The Merchant is cynical, bitter and disillusioned by his two month long marriage. All Rights Reserved. Zacher, eds. Public Domain in most countries other than the UK. If the reader trusts the tale, the fact that the Merchant hates women can be textually supported. Kelly, Henry Ansgar. What we see of May is largely a matter of her secret signs and cunning behavior: and the only lengthy description of her, significantly, is given in the context of presenting her as a good option for January to marry. He has been married two months and has hated every minute of it.

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A Character Analysis of January in The Merchant's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer